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If You See Something, Say Something

Your eyes and ears are the most valuable tools in our effort to keep everyone safe on the T.

To report an emergency or incident, please:

  • Call the Transit Police at 617-222-1212 or dial 911.
  • Download the MBTA See Say App for your iPhone or Android device to make anonymous reports 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. You will get a response within a few minutes.
  • During regular business hours, text tips to 873-873.
  • Use the emergency call boxes on every train and in every station to speak directly with Transit Police dispatch.

You can always report incidents directly to MBTA staff.  

Preventing Terrorism

Our See Something, Say Something program is part of a nationwide effort to recognize and respond to suspicious behavior.

Contact the Transit Police immediately if you notice: 

  • Unattended packages, bags, or luggage
  • Unauthorized people in a restricted area
  • Disorderly or aggressive conduct directed at passengers or MBTA staff
  • Mysterious odors, substances, or smoke in stations or vehicles

Do:

  • Pay attention to the physical characteristics of anyone behaving suspiciously, including their gender, build, hair color, clothing, and distinctive markings (tattoos or birthmarks)
  • Notice if they leave on foot or by car
  • Pay attention to the make, model, and license plate of the vehicle they leave in
  • Note any other helpful information

 

Don't:

  • Take any direct action
  • Confront or interact with the individual or group behaving suspiciously
  • Reveal your suspicions

 

Security Inspections

Since 2006, the MBTA Transit Police, with assistance from the TSA, have conducted random security inspections. When inspections are in progress, signs are posted at all station entrances.

Inspections take less than a minute. Officers may search your bag and brush the exterior with a swab, which is then tested for traces of explosives.

Riders are randomly selected based on a computer-generated number sequence. If you’re selected, you can say no, but you won’t be able ride the MBTA.